Clear Views Blog

Insights and strategies around creating cultures of engagement

Emotional Intelligence: A Simple Tool to Help Increase Your EQ

We all have a trigger that can prompt us to act in a childish, unbecoming, rude or even hostile way for that matter. Feeling a loss of control over a situation, dealing with giving or receiving challenging feedback, overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work ahead. For me, one of my triggers is what I consider “insufficient think time” to process my thoughts and experiences. Admittedly, I tend to appreciate time to think (read overanalyzing, sometimes to the point of analysis paralysis.) Generally, I consider myself self-aware enough to do a decent job of managing my emotions and reactions around this stress trigger of mine.

Read More

5 Positive Behaviors for Handling Conflict within Teams

Every organization faces conflict among team members, breakdowns in communication and behaviors that create more dysfunction than function.  How your leaders handle these challenges becomes the standard which all employees follow. If the team leader is selfish and has a “me first” attitude, then employees will follow suit. If the leader is compassionate and good at listening, then, likewise, the others on his/her team echo that behavior.

Read More

Defining Success: The Meaning of Grit

It’s the first week of March. At the end of 2015 as you look back, what do you want to have attained or accomplished professionally? What's your definition of success? What are you driven to achieve? What matters so deeply to you that you are willing to dedicate time, energy, and emotion to its fulfillment? How do you stay motivated and engaged in the months ahead so that at the end of the year you are celebrating and smiling?

Read More

Building Leadership Skills: Bigger Game

Are you building leadership skills by playing a Bigger Game? What is the nature of a Bigger Game and those who play a Bigger Games?

Read More

Difficult Conversations: Negotiations

I can still remember the moment when I realized two male peers were making 20% more than I was despite our roles, responsibilities and time in our jobs being almost identical. The company had just handed out our expected United Way contributions and the HR director made the mistake of saying the number on our forms was based on 5% of our annual salaries. Since my male peers were sitting beside me, it was not hard to see that my contribution was lower than theirs. I quickly did the math in my head. Now what? Sure, I had suspected they might be making more but now I knew.

Read More
Type a search term below to display relevant content:
    New call-to-action
    New call-to-action

    Subscribe to our Clear Views Blog: